Water Security The Last Drop in Africa

The Last Drop In Security

When we are thirsty 

we go and turn on a tap usually to get ‘a glass of water’.

Back in the 1970’s outside of Europe it was glass bottles of Italian or French water that were available, usually only from an upmarket restaurant. Names like Perrier or Pellegrino come to mind and then through the 1980s other names appeared as Coca Cola, Pepsi and other companies released products into the marketplace.

 

Hikers, joggers, cyclists and children along with others

were seen through the 1990s with a plastic container close at hand.

Primary aquifers were drilled into and utilised for agriculture.

As these primary sources began to deplete, countries such as China and America drilled down into the secondary aquifers.

By the end of the 20th Century we began to hear more about climate change and water. 

With the current conflict in South Sudan, 

it would be worth the question. 

Has water got anything to do with this crisis ? 

It may not be as silly as it sounds. 

An old map only used to look at

general geographical information of the Nile

Egyptian and Sudanese plans to build an airstrip for bombing a dam in the Blue Nile River Gorge in Ethiopia.

The Egyptian and Sudanese governments denied the reports. 

Who Owns the Nile? Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia’s History-Changing Dam

Water is part of sustainable development. Water is also part of survival and for most urban dwellers in western society, clean safe water is just a tap or a plastic bottle away.

 In Africa however, water may not be that accessible and even if it is available

it may be a walk of some hours to obtain it and even then it may not be clean safe drinking water. 

Water security has become, not is going to be, a major concern.

Fresh Water Access & The Business of African Water

When land acquisition is for development the main categories are 

mining, agriculture or housing.

By 2013, international large-scale land transactions amounting to

46 million hectares had been successfully transacted worldwide.

Africa is the main target of these transactions: transactions accounting

for 50 percent* of the verified land deals have been reported in Africa. 

( 23 million hectares* )

 

If we consider the current estimated world population is 7,100,000,000* and that the estimated world population at the end of this decade is 7,717,000,000*

*figures sourced from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_population

My estimates differ from the above prediction for 2020 as the exponential factors when applied have the figure of 7,777,777,777 in 2017 but for this blog I will go with what wiki provides.

The actual number is not the issue here, it is that there is an increase that is the important point.

 Water Shortages Threaten Global Security

This global population increase will be mainly from China, India and Africa. 

This blog has only included Africa here regarding water security. 

It also must be noted that this is a thin coverage of the topic and only makes an attempt to highlight water security for you the reader.

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